Open Menu
 
Introduce Yourself in English (EnglishClass101)

Innovative English takes everything you love about our audio podcasts and puts it in video form. Along the way, we evaluated each section from every angle to make sure it's truly the fastest, easiest, and most fun way to learn a language!

In this lesson you'll learn how to introduce yourself in English with the help of Gustavo and Henry.

Imagine you're on a plane. There's someone next to you. What do you say?

Hi. Alisha here. Introducing yourself in English is easy. In

this lesson, you're going to learn how with Gustavo and Henry, who meet on a plane

Gustavo's moving to New York. His family is going to join him later in the month. Henry

is in the seat when Gustavo gets on the plane. Let's watch!

Excuse me. Sorry about that!

Hi! How do you do? I'm Gustavo. Nice to meet you, Gustavo. I'm Henry Eddins.

I'm sorry. Can you say that again, please? A bit slowly?

Henry Eddins. Henry Eddins.

That's it. But please call me Hank. Hank. Nice to meet you.

Now, with subtitles!

Excuse me. Sorry about that!

Hi! How do you do? I'm Gustavo. Nice to meet you, Gustavo. I'm Henry Eddins.

I'm sorry. Can you say that again, please? A bit slowly?

Henry Eddins. Henry Eddins.

That's it. But please call me Hank. Hank. Nice to meet you.

Here are the key words from the scene.

Hi

but

Excuse me.

too

Nice to meet you.

How do you do?

Here are the key phrases from the scene.

How did Henry apologize when he realized he was in Gustavo's way?

Sorry about that. Sor-ry a-bout that.

In general, this expression, when used to respond to "Excuse me," shows a friendly willingness

to help the other person. In this case, Henry wanted to show he was

happy to move out of Gustavo's way. You can also use it to apologize for a small

mistake, like bumping into someone on the street, or blocking someone's way in the aisle of a supermarket.

Now you try! Say Henry's line after Gustavo speaks.

Excuse me

Sorry about that.

Later, Gustavo also used the word 'sorry' to apologize when he didn't understand Henry's

name. Which phrase did he use?

I'm sorry. I'm sorry.

This is a very common phrase in English for many situations, but here Gustavo uses it to indicate he didn't understand something.

Now you try! Say the line after Henry speaks. I'm sorry.

I'm Henry Eddins.

I'm sorry

Because Gustavo did not understand something, he asked Henry to repeat what he said. To

do this, what polite question did he use? Can you say that again, please?

Can you say that again, please?

In response, English speakers will usually repeat what they have said, and will use the same words.

Now you try! Ask the question after Gustavo says "I'm sorry."

I'm sorry

Can you say that again, please? Gustavo also wanted Henry to speak more slowly.

To do this, what does he ask? A bit slowly?

A bit slowly? This is not a complete sentence, but has a

clear meaning when used after "Can you say that again, please?" In response English speakers

will slow their speech down. Now you try! Say the phrase after Gustavo

says "Can you say that again, please?"

A bit slowly?

After Gustavo said Henry's name, Henry confirmed he said it correctly. How did he do that?

That's it. That's it.

This is like saying, "That's correct," but since the situation was friendly, "That's

it" sounded more natural. Now you try! Say the phrase after Gustavo

says Henry's name correctly.

Henry Eddins.

That's it.

Now, the lesson focus. Here's how to introduce yourself. Ready?

Do you remember how Gustavo introduced himself? Hi! How do you do? I'm Gustavo.

When Gustavo introduced himself, he started with "Hi!" and then used a set phrase

How do you do? How do you do?

This is a polite expression people often use with an introduction. It sounds like a question,

but it has no particular meaning, and there's no expectation the other person will try to answer it.

Next, he says

I'm Gustavo. The first part of this sentence is a contraction

of two words, "I" and "am." The "am" here functions like an equals sign in math.

I'm

The next word in the sentence is a name. Gustavo.

Together it's I'm Gustavo.

The structure of the pattern is Hi! How do you do? I'm

PLUS your name

Now you try! Imagine your name is John. Say "Hi! How do you do? I'm John."

Hi! How do you do? I'm John. Now, imagine your name is Aiko. Say "Hi! How

do you do? I'm Aiko."

Hi! How do you do? I'm Aiko.

Now use your own name.

Ok, there are two additional things you need to know.

First, there's a shortcut for giving your name.

Just drop the "I'm" from the final sentence of the self-introduction.

For example, if Gustavo just said Hi! How do you do? Gustavo.

Henry would have understood it was his name. This would be especially clear if Gustavo

extended his hand for a handshake while saying this.

In very casual situations you can even drop the "Hi! and the "How do you do?" All that

is left would be your name. The second thing you need to know is, you

can use "I'm" with just the first name, or your first name and last name together.

I'm Henry Eddins. Eddins is Henry's family name.

Using both your first name and your last name is a little more formal.

It also gives you less privacy. For example, if people know both your first and last name,

they can find you on the Internet more easily. So it may be MORE common for strangers to

say just their first name than people meeting in a more friendly environment.

Next, you'll learn how to tell people to call you by a nickname, just like Henry did in the scene

But please call me Hank.

But please call me Hank. The first word in the sentence is

But This word is not necessary, but it makes the

transition to the rest of the sentence smoother. Henry uses this to introduce a new piece of

information. And this information changes something about

what he said before. "But" makes this clear. The next word introduces a polite request.

Please Please

Next is a request to use a certain name. call

call After this is the word

me me

Last is a common nickname for men named Henry. Hank

Hank Please call me Hank.

The sentence structure is Please call me

plus your nick name

Now you try! Imagine your nickname is Matt. Say "Please call me Matt."

Please call me Matt Now, imagine your nickname is Lulu.

Say "Please call me Lulu."

Please, call me Lulu.

Now use your own nickname. Say "please call me" and then use your nickname.

Finally, when you meet someone for the first time, it's polite to say a set phrase at the end

Nice to meet you.

Nice to meet you.

Usually, both people will say this or something similar to it.

Now you try.

Nice to meet you.

Now it's time to practice your new ability.

Let's practice! This is your chance to to introduce yourself.

Try to remember what you learned and by speaking aloud!

It's your first day in the U.S., and you're meeting your new neighbor. Ready? Here we go.

What's the first thing you say to someone you've just met?

Hi! How do you do? How do you tell someone your name?

I'm [NAME] I'm Henry Eddins.

How do you tell someone your nickname?

Please call me [Your nickname]

Please call me Hank.

What's the last thing you say to someone you've just met?

Nice to meet you.

Great job! You've just introduced yourself! You'll follow this same pattern many times,

so be sure to practice it.

Well done! Now, watch the scene one more time. After that,

go and practice with all your American friends — or with us in the comments!

Bye.

Excuse me. Sorry about that!

Hi! How do you do? I'm Gustavo.

Nice to meet you, Gustavo. I'm Henry Eddins.

I'm sorry. Can you say that again, please?

A bit slowly? Henry Eddins.

Henry Eddins. That's it. But please call me Hank.

Hank. Nice to meet you.

13:34            
 
 
© Angel Castaño 2008 Salamanca / Poole - free videos to learn real English online || M-E widgetsInfoPrivacyTerms of useContactAboutwhy?
This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read more