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Are you tone deaf or musically gifted? (A simple test for non-musicians) (Kevin George) (BrE)
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Are you tone deaf? or have you got a talent for music? Or maybe you lie somewhere in between. Find out with this musical test.

Hi. Do you wonder if you, a friend or your child might be tone-deaf? Want to find out if you have an ear for music? Watch this 10 minute video and answer 10 simple audio questions to find out. I’m Kevin George aka the BoogeyMan, and welcome to…


          BoogieMan’s School of Music-tronics


Tone deafness, technically referred to as “amusia”, is a condition where an individual cannot perceive or hear any difference in pitch. The patient won't be able to hear or recognize melodies but can still perceive rhythm. In other words, you might not be able to hear or carry a tune, but can still enjoy rhythm and dance to the beat.

Some scientists claim that it affects around 4 percent of the total population. However this term definitely gets overused, even by music professionals, especially when a person doesn't react or interact with music as expected. Sometimes we forget that music, like any other art, is subjective. Maybe you can't identify with that particular style of music.

Personally I'm a little sceptical of that number being that high, having interacted with a gazillion teachers, colleagues and students for over 20 years. as a working musician I can confidently say that I haven't met anyone with such a condition. Not to say that the condition doesn't exist, but rather it's possibly less common than the numbers suggest.

This, of course, does not refer to partial or complete deafness, both of which are serious medical conditions and require medical attention. Here is a simple test I have devised with 10 questions containing audio examples. First grab a piece of paper and a pen or a pencil.

The test will get progressively more intricate as we move on. Each question, we’ll be presented with two possible answers. For answering the questions, simply write down A, for the first option, or B, for the second. You will get around 10 seconds after each question to write down your answers. Feel free to pause and to replay each question before writing down your answer. I will provide the correct answers after each question, and also at the end for you to tally your score.

---- HERE WE GO!
---- Level 1: Pitch Recognition

1- You will hear two notes played one after the other. Is the second note A (higher) or B (lower than the first)?

 [Tones]



I will now put the correct answer.
B (lower)

2- Just like the earlier question, you will again hear two notes played one after the other. Is the second note A (higher) or B (lower than the first note)?

[Tones]



Now for the correct answer.
A (higher)

---- Level 2: Holding a note

3- You will hear two notes separated by a three second gap. Are both the notes A (same) or B (different)?

[Tones]



Here we go with the correct answer.
B (different)

---- Level 3: Understanding Harmony 1

4- You will hear a chord followed by a single note. Do the two A (fit together) or B (clash)?

[Tones]



Here we go with the correct answer.
A (fit)

5- You will hear a full scale followed by a single note. Do the two A (fit together) or B (clash)?

[Tones]



Get ready for the correct answer.
B (clash)

---- Level 4: Understanding Harmony 2

6- You will hear a chord followed by a short musical phrase or melody. Do the two A (fit together) or B (clash)?



[Tones]

Now for the correct answer.
A (fit)


---- SECTION 2
---- Level 5: Understanding Tonality

There are two main types of keys in western music: major and minor. Major scales and chords sound bright and are used to convey happy emotions, while minor scales and chords sound dark and convey sad emotions.

7- In this example you will first hear a chord followed by a short phrase or melody in the same key. Do both of them sound A (major and happy) or B (minor and sad)?

[Tones]



Here comes the correct answer.
A (major)

8- Again in this example you will first hear a chord followed by a short phrase or melody in the same key. Do both of them sound A (major and happy) or B (minor and sad)?

[Tones]



The correct answer is:
 B (minor)

---- Level 6: Understanding Resolution
 
For constructing musical phrases and melodies, we use the idea of dissonance and consonance. Think of it as tension and release, or a question and an answer.

9- In this example you will first hear a chord followed by a short phrase or melody. Does the melody sound A (resolved) or B (unresolved)?
 
[Tones]



Here comes the correct answer:
B (unresolved)

10- Again, in this example you will first hear a chord followed by a short phrase or melody. Does the melody sound A (resolved) or B (unresolved)?

[Tones]



Here we go with the correct answer:
A (resolved)

---- Let’s tally our score ----

Correct answers:

SECTION 1
Level 1: Pitch Recognition
1: B (lower)
2: A (higher)

Level 2: Holding a note
3: B (different)

Level 3: Understanding Harmony 1
4: A (fit)
5: B (clash)

Level 4: Understanding Harmony 2
6: A (fit)

SECTION 2
Level 5: Understanding Tonality
7: A (major)
8: B (minor)

Level 6: Understanding Resolution
9: B (unresolved)
10: A (resolved)





CONCLUSION

Keep in mind that if you were tone deaf, you wouldn’t be able to differentiate pitch.

You also wouldn’t have been able to answer any of these questions!

The fact that you probably answered most if not all of them correctly lets us know that all of us are born with the sense of music in us. And as long as we have medically sound ears, we CAN react, interact and jam with the music around us!

Your tone awareness score:

0- Might be tone deaf
1 to 3 – Below average
4 to 7 – Average
8 to 10 – Above average

TONE-DEAF= A deaf person is someone who can't hear anything. A tone-deaf person is someone who can't notice the difference between different tones.

YOU HAVE AN EAR FOR MUSIC= If you have an ear for music, you are good at getting the melody, tones, etc., you can notice and appreciate music features very well.

aka= A.K.A. = "Also known as..." Used to introduce a nickname, like "I am Tom, aka The music god".

A CONDITION= Also "a medical condition", is a medical problem.

PITCH= Tone.

RHYTHM= /rɪðəm/ 

TO THE BEAT= To the rhythm.

OVERUSED= Used too much.

SCEPTICAL= /skeptɪkəl/ If you are sceptical about something, you don't really believe it, or at least you are not sure about it.

GAZILLION= An imaginary super high number of things.

DEVISED= Created.

GRAB= take, hold.

INTRINCATE= Difficult.

MOVE ON= Advance.

TALLY= Calculate sums.

HOLDING= To hold a note means to keep producing the same musical note, not changing it.

GAP= Blank space or time separation.

SCALE= (music) A group of notes in an ascending or descending order.

FIT TOGETHER= Go well with each other.

CLASH= Don't go well together.

CHORD= /kɔ:*d/ (music) Three or more musical tones.

KEY= (music) The key of a piece is the group of pitches, or scale, that forms the basis of a musical composition in classical, Western art, and Western pop music. Music keys, as well as the single notes, are classified as: Do, Re, Mi, Fa, Sol, La, Si, though in English speaking countries it is more common: C, D, E, F, G, A, B.

DISSONANCE= (music) A disagreeable set of musical notes that don't go well together.

CONSONANCE= (music) A nice and enjoyable set of musical notes that go well together.

SOUND= Healthy, with no problems.

JAM= (coll.) Dance. It doesn't matter if you dance well or not, but you are enjoying dancing.

11:20            
 
 

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