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How to make pizza dough recipe (Videojug)
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Do you like pizza and feel like trying to go Italian yourself for a while? Here are the instructions to make your own perfect pizza dough in just a few minutes. After that, all you need is to add your favourite topping and bake it in the oven to have a fresh homemade pizza with flavours from Italy and all the love and care of a real mamma :)

Hello and welcome to Videojug. We’re going to show you how to make pizza dough.

Step 1: You will need the following ingredients to make a 10 inch or 24.5 centimetre pizza:

175 grams of plain white flour, 1 teaspoon of salt, 1 teaspoon of dried yeast, half a teaspoon of caster sugar, 1 tablespoon of olive oil, 120 millilitres of warm water and polenta for dusting. Here is a handy list of the ingredients:   

- 175 g plain white flour
- 1 tsp salt
- 1 tsp dried yeast
- ½ tsp caster sugar
- 1 tbsp olive oil
- 120 ml warm water
- polenta for dusting
- 2 bowls
- 1 spoon
- some cling film
- 1 rolling pin
- 1 measuring jug
- 1 sieve
- 1 circular baking tray


You will also need the following utensils:

2 bowls, a spoon, some cling film, a rolling pin, a measuring jug, a sieve, and a circular baking tray.

Step 2: Sieve the flour
Begin by placing the flour into a sieve and gently shaking it into the bowl underneath.

Step 3: Make the dough
Now place the salt, yeast, caster sugar into a medium bowl, and using your wooden spoon, combine well. Make a hole in the centre, then add the olive oil and warm water and mix in thoroughly. Give it a quick, final mix by hand creating a rough paste.

Step 4: Knead the dough
Add a little warm water to help remove any remaining dough from the bowl. Continue by kneading the dough for roughly 3 to 4 minutes, using the heel of your hand. Keep kneading until it has formed a smooth ball.

Step 5: Allow to rise
Transfer the dough into a large clean bowl and cover with some cling film. Then allow it to rise for approximately two hours.

Step 6: Roll the dough
When the dough has doubled in size, it’s ready to be rolled. Sprinkle your worktop with some flour and place the dough on top. Now sprinkle some more flour over the dough, and with your rolling pin, roll it into a circle. Turn it over and roll out the other side. Now, take the circular baking tray and flour the base, then lift the dough and place it into the tray, pushing it outwards into a rustic circle. This dough needs to be used within 24 hours, wrapped in cling film and kept in the fridge.

And that’s how to make pizza dough the videojug way.

DOUGH= /dəʊ/ A mixture of flour with water, salt/sugar and maybe other ingredients. We use baked dough to make bread, cakes, etc.

PLAIN= Something plain has no decoration or addition of extra elements, so PLAIN FLOUR is just normal flour, nothing special to it.

TEASPOON= A small spoon used for tea or coffee, and also the amount of something that a teaspoon can take. In recipes it is usually abbreviated to "tsp".

YEAST= A white powder made up of a special kind of fungi which, mixed with wet dough, makes it ferment and so grow in size and become spongy.

TABLESPOON= A normal spoon (neither big nor small), the usual kind of spoon we use to drink soup. Also, the amount of liquid or powder that a tablespoon can take. In recipes it is usually abbreviated to "tbsp".

CASTER SUGAR= Finely ground white sugar use for cookery.

OLIVE OIL= Cooking oil made from olives (obviously), which is the usual kind of oil in Mediterranean cuisine for frying food and as a condiment and salad dressing. It's healthier and has a stronger flavour than other kinds of cooking oils.

POLENTA= A typical Italian food similar to porridge, made of ground maize. Here, they refer to the maize flour, not the maize porridge itself.

DUSTING= To dust may be to remove dust from an object or to put dust on an object. When talking about cooking recipes, to dust something is to sprinkle some kind of edible powder on top of it, for instance, flour or sugar. "Dusting" is the act of sprinkling some powder on top of something.

HANDY= Useful to have "close at hand" (very near you, so that you can use it easily when you need it).

CLING FILM= A kind of plastic film used in the kitchen for preserving food (cling = stick). See picture.

ROLLING PIN= A roll of wood used in the kitchen to flatten dough. See picture.

MEASURING JUG= A pitcher with a measuring scale graved on one side to let you know how much liquid you have inside. See picture.

SIEVE= A device for separating lumps from powdered material, straining liquids, etc., consisting of a container with a mesh or perforated bottom through which the material is shaken or poured. See picture.

UTENSILS= Tools.

PLACING= Putting.

UNDERNEATH= Under it, below, beneath.

COMBINE= (formal) mix.

THOROUGHLY= In an exhaustive manner, carefully, intensely, completely.

ROUGH= Irregular, harsh, imperfect, rustic.

KNEAD= To work and press (a soft substance, such as bread dough) into a uniform mixture with the hands.

REMOVE= Take away.

THE HEEL OF YOUR HAND= The heel is rounded posterior portion of the human foot under and behind the ankle, but we can say "the heel of the hand" to refer to the similar anatomical part in the hand, the part of the hand right after the wrist and before the palm itself.

RISE= Go up, ferment.

SPRINKLE= To scatter (liquid, powder, etc.) in tiny particles or droplets over something.

RUSTIC= Imperfect, unsophisticated, rural (typical from the country life), with a homemade look (as opposed to perfect industrial appearance). A rustic circle is a circle which is not perfect.

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